Nothing will ever be perfect. Lois Lowry offer reader better than perfect goal – Imperfection

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Sitting in a classroom, don’t you wish, that just once that teacher would have no favorites and that he would treat everyone the same? And you know your mom loves your baby brother best, right?

What would you give to have all the pain and anguish of the world hidden away, unable to hurt anyone you loved? Would you give your own life knowing that if you did, those you loved would never feel pain again?

If you, as a reader of young adult novels, have ever toyed with these idea,  Lois Lowry’s “The Giver” will not disappoint you.

The Utopian society she  brings to light in this book are so desirable and she makes it seem so possible.  She creates a society where all the tough, painful memories have been erased from societies minds and histories.

Only the One, the Receiver, has been provided all of these memories as the caretaker of history. Only the Receiver has the ability to let these memories go.

The-Giver

As the One, he holds the most important job in society and he lives the most painful job of any that are assigned in the community, and all occupations are assigned from the Caregiver of the Aged to the House of Knowledge.

The Receiver’s memories stay with him, every war, every known child abuse, every world atrocity, that mankind bestowed on each other, prior to the erasing of pain, The Receiver knows, and keeps that history silently to himself.

Because the pain of the world, and thus the need to violently compete for power has been wiped away, the community has no need to compete for jobs or occupations.

Leaving the assignments to Elders, on the 12th naming day, boys and girls receive their assignment for life. The confusion of choosing one’s own pathway is gone. No more hassles.

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One might call it perfect. No war? No fear? No pain? SIGN ME UP!

While it may seem impeccable, it had its flaws, and herein lies the lovely construction of the conflict that ironically plaques the protagonist’s, Jonas, community. In a community that is supposed to be free from conflict, it is impossible to escape it, when following one’s own rules.

Sameness has advantages, or does it?
This novel will push the world in a new perspective even if the reader antagonistically tries to fight the push. It will drag the reader mind own open,  if it is determined to be shut.

As a reader, one’s point of view is always on the outside looking in, like a giant 10 year old looking into a snow globe. It allows you to view our world as an outsider’s standpoint.

Nothing will ever be perfect and that’s the beauty of life: imperfection”

It really makes you take a step back and realize how the world works today and why. Nothing will ever be perfect and that’s the beauty of life: imperfection. Lois Lowry did a great job proving the reader with this message.

lgiver

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Nothing will ever be perfect. Lois Lowry offer reader better than perfect goal – Imperfection