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Want to honor the fallen? Visit a Nashville Military landmarks

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The Bobcat Beat has put together a list of places to visit Monday, Memorial Day, and if not on this typical day of remembrance, we challenge you to visit our list of important Tennessee state and national landmarks before Independence Day to better understand our history and how it relates to the Armed Forces

War Memorial Auditorium:

When the War Memorial Auditorium was built in 1925, and was designed by architect, Edward Dougherty. He won a Gold Medal Award which is the highest medal an architect can win from American Institute of Architecture. The Auditorium was built to honor First World War (1914-1918 veterans and became a concert hall where the Nashville Symphony called home.

WMA

Legislative Plaza

Visit Legislative Plaza to be transformed from Nashville to a singularly unique environment that will immediately make the visitor think of Greek gods and greek architecture.War Memorial WYCO _ 11.9.1402

On the west and north walls of Legislative  Plaza’s War Memorial Auditorium are the names of 3,400 Tennesseans who gave their lives in World War I.  In the center of the plaza atrium is a statue entitled “Victory” by Nashville sculptor Belle Kinney.

On each side of this atrium lie wings housing government offices. Below the plaza and atrium is a labyrinth “of government office spaces and committee rooms for the Tennessee General Assembly”. Step out onto the plaza and look north to see the Tennessee State Capitol.

Through the underground Motlow Tunnel, Legislative Plaza is connected to the Tennessee State Capitol.

Few parks in Nashville and Tennessee honor the women veterans of war and conflict. On the plaza stands a statue dedicated to the Women of the Confederacy also sculpted by Belle  Kinney and a monument to the Tennesseans who served in the Korean War by sculptor Russell Faxon.

War Memorial WYCO _ 11.9.1477Tennessee State Capitol

The State Capitol built  in 1845-58 opened just prior to the South’s own conflict in 1859.

The architect William Strickland gave the citizens of Tennessee a building of strength and stature as it can be seen for miles atop large bluff, and it remains a crowning landmark for the state, as little of it has changed. This is a testament to the architect, Strickland. When he died suddenly during construction in 1854, he was buried in the north facade of the Capitol.

The cornerstone for the building was laid on July 4, 1845, and construction finished in 1859.

The grounds of the State Capitol contain statues honoring Sam Davis, Sgt. Alvin York, and Presidents Andrew Jackson and Andrew Johnson.

The tombs of President and Mrs. James K. Polk are also located on the Capitol grounds. an equestrian statue of President Andrew Jackson by Clark Mills, monuments to Civil War hero Sam Davis and World War I hero Alvin York

Six cedar trees planted are planted on the north face to commemorate the six million Jews who died as a result of the Holocaust.

The building, listed as a National Landmark is in Greek revival style and matches that of the Legislative Plaza.

War Memorial WYCO _ 11.9.1452

TENNESSEE WAR MONUMENTS

If getting in your car and driving is more appealing, then think or visiting one of Tennessee’s many war monuments located all over the state.

Tennessee has devoted much to remembering its military heritage and the best site to plan a drive is TNVacations.com

Battle of Nashville

“Too often with the pride of military victory comes the tragedy of lost lives. Tennessee remembers its brave soldiers and courageous leaders in beautiful monuments and museums that adorn the state.” One doesn’t have to drive far to see historical statues, battlegrounds and monuments.

Historical Markers line the streets of Nashville celebrating a variety of different historical features of our Tennessee history and many of the markers indicate a site where a specific battle of the Civil War or other conflict took place.

This interactive link is excellent in planning any trip.

HISTORICAL MARKERS OF TENNESSEE

Below is a selected list of place to visit:battle of nashville

SHY’S HILL
REDOUBT NO. 1
FORT NEGLEY
BATTLE OF NASHVILLE MONUMENT
REDOUBT NO. 3
REDOUBT NO. 4
GRANBURY’S LUNETTE
KELLEY’S BATTERY
GLEN LEVEN ESTATE
TRAVELLERS REST

Lastly, if your computer is as far as you want to travel – one website stands above all others for military history in Tennessee. The Tennessee State Museum is a great place to visit, and if that is not a choice, visit the website.

The Military Museum housed in the TSM rotates exhibits online. Currently, the exhibit about WWI doughboys is excellent.

 

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Want to honor the fallen? Visit a Nashville Military landmarks